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Questions remain over death of Beata Tichonovic in Faversham

By KentOnline reporter

The heartbroken family of a young woman who died just three days after Christmas will never know whether she intended to take her own life.

The body of Beata Tichonovic, 24, was discovered by her housemate in Spillett Close, Faversham, early on December 28 last year, with empty packets of prescription drugs found on a table in the kitchen.

An inquest has now ruled that Lithuanian-born Ms Tichonovic had died from intoxication of anti-depressant drugs and alcohol.

Beata Tichonovic, 24, died three days after Christmas

Beata Tichonovic, 24, died three days after Christmas

Her mother Ana Tichonovic and sister Vesta Sinkevic heard assistant coroner Chris Morris read out evidence at the Archbishop’s Palace in Maidstone.

A statement from Dr Simon Lundy at Newton Place Surgery said that Ms Tichonovic had booked various appointments since she registered there in April 2014, mostly about her depression and anxiety.

However, on December 16, the last time Dr Lundy saw Ms Tichonovic, she said she had no intention to self-harm and no suicidal thoughts.

Just 12 days later Beata had died.

Detective Sergeant Paul Fewtrell told the hearing: “We were informed by our colleagues from the ambulance service that Beata had been found by her housemate at about 3.50am.

“We carried out a number of different lines of enquiry and from the information we received, I found no evidence of third party involvement, with no evidence of a disturbance or false entry, and everything of any value still in the premises.

The inquest was heard at the Archbishops' Palace in Maidstone

The inquest was heard at the Archbishops' Palace in Maidstone

“In the kitchen there were a number of open packets of prescribed medication.

“My hypothesis is that she had a drink and drugs overdose, whether it was by accident or with intent.”

Assistant coroner Chris Morris said: “I have carefully considered the evidence which was before me.

“Beata’s death was a shock to those close to her.

“I accept the evidence that the medical cause of death was intoxication of drugs and alcohol.

“I am not satisfied that Beata intended to kill herself but there is nothing like sufficient evidence to say that it was not intended.

“It could have been an accident but that would be speculation.”

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