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Depressed Janet Simpson took her own life by jumping from a bridge onto the A21 near Tonbridge

A depressed woman left her home in the middle of the night and killed herself by jumping from a bridge onto the A21, an inquest heard.
 
Janet Simpson died after she was spotted lying in the central reservation of the carriageway just before 4.30am on November 20.
 
The 61-year-old's Vauxhall Astra was found parked but unlocked immediately above her on a footbridge running over the Tonbridge bypass.
 
Gravesend Old Town Hall

Gravesend Old Town Hall

The inquest at Gravesend's Old Town Hall on Wednesday heard Mrs Simpson was wearing just a top, underwear and shoes.
 
The retired post worker suffered severe blood loss as a result of multiple injuries and a pelvic fracture. 
 
She had left her mobile phone and handbag at home, and her husband Graham was said to be in a confused state when police, having traced the car to him,  called at his home in Longmead Way, Tonbridge, asking of his wife's whereabouts.
 
"I am satisfied that Mrs Simpson had the intention of taking her own life, both from her remarks and the way in which her death occurred" - North Kent coroner Roger Hatch
 
 
Mrs Simpson was said to have a long history of both depression and anxiety and had made remarks in the run-up to her death about not wanting to be a burden.
 
She was taking anti-depressants for her condition, diagnosed in 2011 after having an operation which removed 70% of her bowel.
 
North Kent coroner Roger Hatch was told this had a severe impact on her life.
 
Mrs Simpson also had to undergo a full hysterectomy on medical grounds in 2014 and shortly before her death developed a serious bladder infection.
 
She became more anxious, did not want to be left alone and had trouble sleeping.
 
Det Sgt David Shipley said on one occasion Mr Simpson had to restrain his wife when she tried to leave their home in the middle of the night, distressed and saying she neeed to go for a drive.
 
The day before she killed herself, Mr Simpson attended a funeral and left his wife in the care of a friend.
 
DS Shipley said Mrs Simpson made comments about being a pain for everyone and that it would be better if she was not around.
 
"She had taken a downward turn and believed the world would be better off without her," he added. "She expressed thoughts about not wanting to be a burden."
 
Mr Simpson praised the officer at the end of the inquest for his "exemplary" professionalism and "tremendous support".
 
Concluding that Mrs Simpson's death was due to suicide, the coroner said: "I am satisfied that Mrs Simpson had the intention of taking her own life, both from her remarks and the way in which her death occurred."
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