Home   Canterbury   News   Article

Mangalica: Rare woolly pigs spotted at Tyler Hill playing field, Canterbury

By Lydia Chantler-Hicks

Rare woolly pigs have been spotted in Kent once again - this time in a children's playground to the north of Canterbury.

After a sighting in a nearby woodland last month, the unusual beasts were seen at Tyler Hill playing field, in Summer Lane, this morning.

They are thought to be Mangalica - a Hungarian breed of domestic pig which was once on the brink of extinction.

The pigs were spotted at Tyler Hill playing field
The pigs were spotted at Tyler Hill playing field

The hairy animals were spotted by a local resident, who said: "I was walking back to my car from the woods after walking my dogs, to find pigs entering the playing field.

"There were three of them and they were literally just happily walking round the playing field."

It is believed they are the very same pigs that were spotted last month by volunteers working in Thornden Woods, between Whitstable and Herne Bay.

Pigs in blankets? The pigs have an unusual woolly coat
Pigs in blankets? The pigs have an unusual woolly coat

Mangalica are thought to be extremely rare in the UK.

Staff at Wildwood Discovery Park near Thornden Woods said the woolly trio have previously been sighted just outside their park's boundaries.

A wildlife park spokesman said the pigs are believed to be domesticated, but that no owners have yet been identified.

Following the Thornden Woods sighting, Wildwood spokesman Dan Farrow said: "The woolly pigs are a domestic breed called Mangalica, originating in Hungary and are not indigenous to the UK.

The sheep-like animals are thought to be Mangalica
The sheep-like animals are thought to be Mangalica

"There are a number of farms in the UK which breed them for meat and they also make good pets, but as far as we're aware there are no wild colonies on our shores.

"Chances are that the pigs roaming Thornden Woods have escaped from a farm or a private collection - they have certainly not escaped from Wildwood, as we do not have any of this breed at the park.

"They're not a danger to the public unless cornered or threatened, but you should keep your distance and report any sightings to the council.

"Hopefully the owners will be found soon."

Join the debate...
Comments |

Don't have an account? Please Register first!

The KM Group does not moderate comments. Please click here for our house rules.

People who post abusive comments about other users or those featured in articles will be banned.

Thank you. Your comment has been received and will appear on the site shortly.

 

Terms of Comments
We do not actively moderate, monitor or edit contributions to the reader comments but we may intervene and take such action as we think necessary, please click here for our house rules. If you have any concerns over the contents on our site, please either register those concerns using the report abuse button, contact us here, email multimediadesk@thekmgroup.co.uk or call 01634 227989.

Follow us

Like Us on Facebook

Most popular

Kent Travel News

Close This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.Learn More