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Dog to be put down after attack on cow in Dover

By Emily Stott

Police had to pull a Staffordshire cross from a cow after it attacked the animal in a field near Dover’s Western Heights.

The Dexter cow was grazing next to St Martin’s Battery, South Military Hill when it was attacked.

The dog left the cow badly injured with serious wounds to its muzzle and mouth and the Staffordshire cross is due to be put down.

This cow was attacked by Staffordshire Cross at St Martin's Battery
This cow was attacked by Staffordshire Cross at St Martin's Battery

Now the White Cliffs Countryside Partnership (WCCP) is reminding people to control their dogs in any field where there is livestock.

Kirk Alexander, partnership manager, said: “We would like to thank the members of the public who alerted the police.

“We would also like to thank the police who arrived promptly and were able to quickly stop the attack and were also able to obtain the details of the owner.

“The steer was badly injured with serious wounds to its muzzle and mouth.

"It was taken back to the home farm where it was treated by a vet and is expected to recover fully. The other two Dexter cattle in the field have also been taken back to the farm.

“There were warning signs about the grazing animals at the entrances to the field.

"We would like to remind people to control their dogs in any field where there are grazing animals.”

Mr Alexander said police were very prompt and had to use pepper spray to remove the dog from the cow.

The dog was a Staffordshire cross similar to this one. Stock image.
The dog was a Staffordshire cross similar to this one. Stock image.

He said: “The WCCP tries to ensure that some cattle-free fields are available for anyone who doesn’t want to go near the cattle.

“Thankfully, incidents of attacks by dogs on grazing animals have been very rare on sites managed by us and we are grateful for the assistance shown by the vast majority of dog owners.

“Chalk grassland, as found on the green slopes around the Western Heights, is one of the richest habitats for wildlife in Europe, particularly for orchids and other wild flowers as well as many insects and other invertebrates.

“Chalk grassland needs to be grazed otherwise it is invaded naturally by shrubs and trees and the rare wildlife is shaded out.”

A Kent Police spokesman said: “Kent Police is investigating possible criminal offences in relation to this incident and has taken details of those involved.

"It is understood the owner has arranged for the dog to be put down. Enquiries are continuing.”

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