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Adeline Reidy and Peter Sherred fight littering and fly-tipping in urban and rural Dover

By Sam Lennon

An old bicycle tossed onto a hedge, a washing machine and chairs dumped by the roadside.

Even vodka bottles were lobbed over the wall into school grounds after the land was cleared.

These are some of the depressing cases anti-litter campaigners Peter Sherred and Adeline Reidy have had to deal with in their efforts to keep Dover tidy.

The washing machine and chairs at Old Charlton Road, Dover. Picture: Peter Sherred.
The washing machine and chairs at Old Charlton Road, Dover. Picture: Peter Sherred.

Mr Sherred said: “Now the verges are in the process of being cut deposited litter becomes more visible and needs to be removed promptly so it does not become a magnet for this moronic activity to continue.”

The bicycle was thrown on top of a hedge at Pineham Road, Guston, and the washing machine and chairs were in Old Charlton Road, Dover.

Mr Sherred is from the Rotary Club of Dover and his group recently cleaned up the grounds of St Mary’s Primary School in Laureston Place, Dover.

Shortly afterwards it was littered with small used vodka bottles and cans.

He said: “The sad thing is bottles and cans and other items are already being deposited on the areas we cleared.

“Small vodka bottles are routinely being thrown over the wall over the playground and someone must know who is buying these items and throwing them into the school grounds."

Cycle of flytipping. The bike dumped at Pineham. Picture: Peter Sherred
Cycle of flytipping. The bike dumped at Pineham. Picture: Peter Sherred

Fellow litter campaigner Adeline Reidy, of Dover’s Castle Street Society, says that members of the public need to report fly-tipping and litter when they see it.

Mrs Reidy is particularly anxious that the town is made presentable to visitors during the summer season, even keeping the fronts of their own homes and businesses clean, even putting up flower baskets where possible.

She added: “If people, when walking through the town, picked up rubbish they saw and deposited it in a bin the whole environment of the town could be transformed.”

Mrs Reidy said that a number of people are already doing this.

Mrs Reidy said that a number of people are already doing this.

Both campaigners have praised Dover District Council for its prompt action after receiving reports of dumping and its attempts to keep the area clean.

It swiftly took away the rubbish collected by the Rotarians at St Mary’s School and has supplied the Castle Street area with dog fouling signs.

Highways England has also cleared up the central reservation of the A2 between Jubilee Way and the Whitfield roundabout after lobbying by Mr Sherred.

He said: “The central reservation vegetation was removed smartening up the road for travellers to and from the port.”

Mr Sherred and Mrs Reidy use the slogan “bag it, bin it, don’t drop it” to encourage keeping the area tidy.

Both have been made Paul Harris Fellows, the highest Rotarian honour, for their efforts in the community.

A spokesman for Dover District Council said: “We continue to work hard to tackle issues of fly tipping across the district.

“ If a member of the public witnesses fly tipping, they can report it online on the DDC website at www.dover.gov.uk/flytipping or by telephoning 01304 872428 during office hours, or 01304 821199 outside of office hours.”

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