Home   Folkestone   News   Article

Staring at seagulls could save your chips, so give it a go says Kent council

By Eleanor Perkins

Staring at seagulls makes them less likely to steal your food, according to new research.

And one Kent council is encouraging residents to give it a go.

Folkestone & Hythe District Council tweeted about the new findings by researchers at University of Exeter, along with their own advice on how best to manage the nuisance birds.

They wrote: "According to researchers @UniofExeter making eye contact with seagulls make them less likely to eat your chips.

"Give it a try!* #seagullstareoff

"If that doesn't work try our handy tips."

Their own suggestions include reducing the availability of easy-to-reach food and not to feed the gulls or drop left over food in the streets.

The unusual experiment, conducted by the University of Exeter, saw researchers put a bag of chips on the ground and monitor how long it took herring gulls to approach when a human was watching them, compared to when the human looked away.

On average, gulls took 21 seconds longer to approach the food with a human staring at them.

New research says staring at seagulls will make them less likely to steal your food. Picture: Kathryn Hewitt
New research says staring at seagulls will make them less likely to steal your food. Picture: Kathryn Hewitt

The researchers attempted to test 74 gulls, but most flew away or would not approach – only 27 approached the food, and 19 completed both the “looking at” and “looking away” tests.

The findings focus on these 19 gulls.

"Gulls are often seen as aggressive and willing to take food from humans, so it was interesting to find that most wouldn’t even come near during our tests,” said lead author Madeleine Goumas, of the Centre for Ecology and Conservation at Exeter’s Penryn Campus in Cornwall.

"Of those that did approach, most took longer when they were being watched.
"Some wouldn’t even touch the food at all, although others didn’t seem to notice that a human was staring at them.

"We didn’t examine why individual gulls were so different – it might be because of differences in personality and some might have had positive experiences of being fed by humans in the past – but it seems that a couple of very bold gulls might ruin the reputation of the rest."

Senior author Dr Neeltje Boogert added: “Gulls learn really quickly, so if they manage to get food from humans once, they might look for more.

Gulls are often considered a nuisance because of behaviours like food-snatching. Picture: George Poule
Gulls are often considered a nuisance because of behaviours like food-snatching. Picture: George Poule

“Our study took place in coastal towns in Cornwall, and especially now, during the summer holidays and beach barbecues, we are seeing more gulls looking for an easy meal.

"We therefore advise people to look around themselves and watch out for gulls approaching, as they often appear to take food from behind, catching people by surprise.

“It seems that just watching the gulls will reduce the chance of them snatching your food.”

The UK’s herring gulls are in decline, though numbers in urban areas are rising.

Gulls in these areas are often considered a nuisance because of behaviours like food-snatching.

The researchers say their study shows that any attempt to manage this issue by treating all gulls as being alike could be futile, as most gulls are wary of approaching people.

Instead, people might be able to reduce food-snatching by the few bold individuals by modifying their own behaviour.

Read more: All the latest news from Folkestone

Join the debate...
Comments |

Don't have an account? Please Register first!

The KM Group does not moderate comments. Please click here for our house rules.

People who post abusive comments about other users or those featured in articles will be banned.

Thank you. Your comment has been received and will appear on the site shortly.

 

Terms of Comments
We do not actively moderate, monitor or edit contributions to the reader comments but we may intervene and take such action as we think necessary, please click here for our house rules. If you have any concerns over the contents on our site, please either register those concerns using the report abuse button, contact us here, email multimediadesk@thekmgroup.co.uk or call 01634 227989.

Close This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.Learn More