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James Ford, killer of Ashford's Amanda Champion in 2003 was 'London Bridge terror attack hero'

It is believed a convicted murderer, on day release from an open prison, was one of those hailed a hero after a terrorist killed two people in London Bridge on Friday.

James Ford, 42, from Willesborough, Ashford, was jailed for life in 2004 for the murder of Amanda Champion, a 21-year-old with learning difficulties.

Convicted killer James Ford came to the aid of a woman stabbed during the London Bridge terror attack
Convicted killer James Ford came to the aid of a woman stabbed during the London Bridge terror attack

But it has now emerged he came to the aid of a woman stabbed in the incident.

It is believed he was in the final days of serving a sentence at Sheppey's open prison, HMP Standford Hill.

The former factory worker killed Miss Champion, who had the mental age of a 15-year-old and left her body on wasteland.

He was arrested after the murder in July 2003 after calling the Samaritans and confessing to the crime.

Police confirmed overnight the suspect shot dead on the bridge was Usman Khan, 28.

Amanda Champion was found dead in 2003 in Ashford
Amanda Champion was found dead in 2003 in Ashford

He was out of prison on licence at the time of the attack.

A man and a woman were killed and three others were injured during the incident which sparked a armed police response.

The attack started at Fishmongers' Hall where a conference on prisoner rehabilitation was taking place, hosted by Cambridge University.

It is believed Usman Khan was among the former prisoners attending the event.

The Daily Mail reports Amanda's aunt Angela Cox, 65, was notified of his involvement by Kent Police.

A bench was erected in memory of Amanda Champion in Willesborough
A bench was erected in memory of Amanda Champion in Willesborough

The quoted her saying: "He is not a hero. He is a murderer out on day release, which us as a family didn't know anything about. He murdered a disabled girl. He is not a hero, absolutely not.

"The police liaison officer called me saying he was on the TV. I am so angry. They let him out without even telling us. Any of my family could have been in London and just bumped into him.

"'It was a hell of a shock."


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