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Residents of Island Park, Hoo St Werburgh, unhappy with changes to entrance barrier gate caused by too many deliveries


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Residents at a mobile home park have hit out at changes to the way an entrance barrier and gate are operated and claim they will not be able to get their deliveries.

Some of the people who live at the park say they might not be able to walk the 400 yards or so to open the barrier because they are immobile - after it was decided to change the rules on deliveries and visitors.

Residents' association member Kim Brierly talking about her concerns

Up until recently, staff at Island Park, Hoo St Werburgh, let delivery people and visitors through so they could go direct to homes.

But with a large increase in the number of deliveries, it was decided residents now have to walk to the barrier themselves to let them in.

The entrance is opened for emergency services, postmen and services such as gas engineers and healthcare workers like carers.

Homeowner Kim Brierly, who has lived there for almost five years, is not happy.

The 64-year-old said: "I was sold this dream. They are beautiful homes and it looks like a paradise.

Some residents have protested for the gate to be opened. Picture: Kim Brierly
Some residents have protested for the gate to be opened. Picture: Kim Brierly

"But I did not know it would be like this when I moved in.

"Some people are quite immobile and vulnerable. I live on my own and there are people who cannot walk to open the gate.

"We are not complaining about the security but this is the straw that broke the camel's back. It is immoral and ridiculous."

The NHS booking co-ordinator says some people who live on the over 50s' site struggle to walk the 400 yards to open and close the gate – this move could leave them isolated.

The previous sign when the gate would be opened by the office. Picture: Kim Brierly
The previous sign when the gate would be opened by the office. Picture: Kim Brierly

However, owner Denis Swann has moved to explain the situation – saying the number of deliveries was becoming a real issue and most residents are supportive.

He said: "I ask if anyone who has got a problem with it to come and talk to us.

"If they are vulnerable we will help them and fully accept and understand and have put measures in place to assist.

"It is breaching our security to leave the barrier open. There are a lot of people who do not want the gate left open.

"There is more against it than for it.

The office for the boats docked at the park. Picture: Kim Brierly
The office for the boats docked at the park. Picture: Kim Brierly

"If people want to order shopping they have to take responsibility. They are more than capable to get it."

He stated he is helping those who need it if they are unable to get to the entrance.

Mr Swann added: "It is an office, not a gate house.

"They were fully aware the security of the marina is paramount.

"For a while back we would open it and we would let them in but when we started doing it there was a handful of deliveries.

"It is affecting the office. We were having to stop what we were doing to open the gate."

Despite this the site's residents' association has complained saying it was not consulted when the new rules were enforced.

Kim added: "It has always been difficult for the deliveries. There are very strict rules. In this day and age everyone has been ordering online. It is a vital thing to have deliveries coming in and out.

"We need to make a point. We have got human rights and need to live our lives fully."

Association chairman Ian Dunkley, 68, said: "We are all of the same view. It is appalling. We are happy to help others but in a few years we might not be able to walk down there and let anyone in.

The signs stipulating the new rules for deliveries and visitors. Picture: Kim Brierly
The signs stipulating the new rules for deliveries and visitors. Picture: Kim Brierly

"It has been the case for five years and has been adequate. It is terribly awful."

Mr Swann says the office staff, who are there for the boatmen docked in the marina and part of a separate company, were opening the barriers as a favour.

But after nearly 60 to 70 deliveries a day it is just not possible to continue.

He confirmed he had considered other options such as installing a buzzer system in homes so people could open the gate remotely, but said not everyone can see the gate so would not be able to stop people entering who may pose a security risk.

He continued: "How do we stop tailgating? It is not possible to do. We have security in place. My job is to understand the security risks and health and safety."

The park owner also added the office cannot be certain if visitors or deliveries are genuine therefore it is safer for the community if residents take responsibility for anyone asking for them at the gate.

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