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Chatham's Scott Fisher completes 27 marathons in 27 days mission for Mast Cell Action


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After 27 days of running, Captain Scott Fisher has crossed the finish line of his mammoth mission of running 27 marathons in as many days.

In total the Royal Engineer has run 707 miles, which is the equivalent of running from Glasgow to Paris, to raise awareness for Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), a condition his wife, Megan, suffers from.

Scott and his family on his final day. Picture: Scott Fisher
Scott and his family on his final day. Picture: Scott Fisher

The 31-year-old said: "I cannot believe how much awareness the marathons have generated for MCAS.

"I have been constantly amazed and inspired by all the MCAS sufferers who have written to me saying that they feel like they have hope for the first time; these messages have kept me going. I would also like to say a huge thanks to everyone involved, and those who have donated so far.

"Although it has been me running, close to 20,000 people have made this happen and the struggle I put myself through the last 27 days is nothing compared to what Megan and other MCAS sufferers face; they fight this fight daily.

"I have been labelled a hero for this; but those with MCAS and other chronic illnesses, are the real heroes."

Scott has not had a single day off since embarking on his journey on December 11 and has faced freezing temperatures and torrential rain and has juggled visits to see Megan, 26, and looking after their three-year-old daughter, Mollie-Rose.

Megan’s condition flared up in December during the early days of his challenge, leading to an extended hospital stay.

Megan who suffers from MCAS with husband Scott. Picture: Scott Fisher / Just Giving
Megan who suffers from MCAS with husband Scott. Picture: Scott Fisher / Just Giving

She was first struck down with MCAS in 2018 following the birth of her child and now has to take 27 pills a day to manage her condition – the number which inspired Scott to undertake the 27 marathons.

It is a rare syndrome which only affects 17% of the general population.

MCAS forms part of a spectrum of mast cell disorders and - due to its complex nature, a lack of universally accepted diagnostic criteria and access to tests under the NHS - it becomes challenging to diagnose.

Speaking to KMTV after the final run, Scott from Chatham said: "One word for Megan has been debilitating. It has destroyed her life.

"You are trapped because when your wife is having a seizure there is nothing you can do."

He also told of what he hopes for the future. He said: "The first one that is critical is cutting diagnosis times so equipping front line medical staff with the knowledge firstly to spot the syndrome and the symptoms it presents with.

Megan takes 27 pills a day to manage her condition. Picture: Scott Fisher / Just Giving
Megan takes 27 pills a day to manage her condition. Picture: Scott Fisher / Just Giving

"Secondary to that if you catch someone with MCAS really early you can apply a lot less drugs and drug routines to them. That early intervention to me is really critical."

Mast cells provide an important line of defence in our immune systems and in people affected by MCAS their cells respond too frequently or excessively to things that are not typically considered harmful.

This can include foods, chemicals, drugs, fragrances, temperature, exercise, stress, hormonal fluctuations and infection.

Scott and his daughter Mollie-Rose. Picture: Scott Fisher
Scott and his daughter Mollie-Rose. Picture: Scott Fisher

Scott's initial fundraising target of £27,000 was reached within days and he subsequently raised his target to £270,000, an amount he would never have dreamt of prior to starting the challenge.

He hopes to raise another £45,000 to meet his target now the challenge has been completed.

The fundraiser has raised more than £225,000 and you can donate here.

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