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The Hayesbrook School in Tonbridge extends range of Covid-19 PPE being made for NHS and care workers

A school has extended the range of personal protective equipment (PPE) it is making to support frontline health and care workers.

The Hayesbrook School in Tonbridge began producing PPE when a working group was set up by design and technology teacher Dave Roberts and pupils, who started by manufacturing visors in the school’s workshop.

Masks and scrub bags which are being made by Jane Grier at The Hayesbrook School
Masks and scrub bags which are being made by Jane Grier at The Hayesbrook School

Now the group has been joined by chairman of the Academy Council, Jane Grier, who has extended the school’s range of PPE products by stitching face masks and scrub bags.

So far she has made 160 items, which have all been delivered to Tonbridge Care Home, Barnes Lodge Care Home, Tonbridge Cottage Hospital and Kent Mobility.

Mrs Grier said: "When I learnt about what great work our students are doing to support health workers in the community, I was really inspired and wanted to support them.

"I thought this is something I can also get behind, I enjoying sewing and very quickly from my dining table I started stitching masks and scrub bags.

"It's lovely to be part of the Hayesbrook community, who are pulling together, working as a team, delivering the needs of the school and at the same time helping our neighbours that are on the frontline.

Jane Grier, from The Hayesbrook School, wearing a material face mask she has made for health and care workers
Jane Grier, from The Hayesbrook School, wearing a material face mask she has made for health and care workers

"I will continue to work with the school by producing more of the same or extending the range further if needed. If I can stitch it, I will make it."

The school's first visor delivery was made to Tonbridge House Care Home on April 29.

Staff at the academy decided to take action when a school's supplier shared a visor design featuring low-cost material that can be easily laser-cut using tools at the school's workshop.

Collette Nelson, head of school at Hayesbrook, said: "We're delighted to welcome Mrs Grier to the working group.

"We have received such an amazing response from those we have delivered to. Just with our small contribution to help keep frontline workers safe and the ongoing effort of our volunteers it is a positive reminder that there are good things happening."

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