Home   Herne Bay   News   Article

Herne Bay Pier captured in drone pictures and videos but Canterbury City Council won't take action

The council has no short-term plans to address the deteriorating state of Herne Bay’s pier head.

Drone footage this week revealed the crumbling condition of the isolated structure, which has long-been left to rack and ruin.

Broken wooden pillars and planks are scattered across the landmark and one bird’s-eye shot shows the roof has almost completely fallen apart.

Scroll down for video

The old Herne Bay pier.
The old Herne Bay pier.

But Canterbury City Council says demolishing or removing it would prove too costly.

Spokesman Robert Davies said: “Our current approach is to monitor the pier and use reports from our structural surveys to inform a plan if things get substantially worse.

“The cost of removing or demolishing the structure would be considerable, as it is past the mean low water springs mark and would need heavy marine plant and divers to do the work.

“In addition, the pier head has our wave and tide gauge equipment mounted on it, which would need to be relocated at further cost.

“There are no plans in the short-term but if there was a major collapse, we would have to rethink that approach.”

The old Herne Bay pier.
The old Herne Bay pier.
Birdseye picture of the old Herne Bay pier, taken with a drone.
Birdseye picture of the old Herne Bay pier, taken with a drone.

The old pier, constructed in 1895, was once the longest in the country – stretching out to an impressive 3,787ft. 

“There are no plans in the short-term but if there was a major collapse, we would have to rethink that approach.” - Council spokesman Robert Davies

During the Second World War its middle section was blown up by the Army to prevent enemy landings and was later replaced by two temporary bridges.

But after storms in 1978 and 1979 caused progressive collapse of the central portion of the pier between the bridges, its remains were dismantled in 1980 – leaving the pier head stranded.

Its condition has deteriorated in recent years, particularly in the central and southern sections, despite annual maintenance and a structural survey being carried out every two years.

What do you think? Leave your comments below. 


More by this author


Close This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.Learn More