Wedding cars and wedding transport


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One of the more important arrangements that have to be made when a wedding is being planned, is the transport.

The bride’s father traditionally pays for the vehicles that are to take his wife, the bridesmaids, himself and his daughter (the bride) to the church or other wedding venue.

His is also the responsibility to provide the transport that takes him, his wife and other principal participants in the wedding, on to the reception.

Driving into the sunset...but how will you travel?
Driving into the sunset...but how will you travel?

Traditionally it is the groom who provides the transport that takes himself and his bride to the reception because, again traditionally, she has now come under his charge.

In effect, and because these days many traditions are being ignored, the cost of transport is often shared by both families so the demarcation lines between who pays for what have become somewhat blurred.

Whoever eventually pays however, the fact remains, a certain number of vehicles will be required to get the principals to the ceremony and on to the reception afterwards, and the vehicle that carries the bride in either direction is usually the best, the most spectacular and frequently quite unusual.

Decoration on the outside of cars, often using satin ribbon, remains popular
Decoration on the outside of cars, often using satin ribbon, remains popular

The favoured mode of transport is often still a white Rolls Royce driven by a liveried chauffeur and decorated with white satin ribbons. There is a lot to be said for such a vehicle. First of all, it’s large enough to accommodate the bride’s gown without crushing it, it is warm and easily heated should the weather be less than clement.

If on the other hand the weather is hot, limousines of this nature are usually air conditioned so the bride arrives at the church, or other ceremonial venue, looking (and feeling) cool, calm and collected. And the sheer dignity exuded by a Rolls takes a great deal of beating.

There are other alternatives.

Gaining popularity these days are the veteran and vintage vehicles that have been preserved in concourse condition.

How will you travel to the big day?
How will you travel to the big day?

They may be less than comfortable, they could lack what are considered essential modern amenities but they are certainly spectacular.

Alternatively the bride may choose a horse-drawn carriage Now this really does have impact and the more horses drawing the carriage, the greater the impact.

A horse and carriage is a more unusual way to reach your wedding
A horse and carriage is a more unusual way to reach your wedding

Carriages and old vehicles of course, do have certain disadvantages. Their springing is hard to say the least. They don’t have heating, they can be draughty and many have less room inside than the average family car, so dresses can become creased.

The open ones can be extremely draughty which is risky for a pretty headdress.

It’s all a matter of preference.

Some brides are content with something different and are prepared to put up with the discomforts.

Others cannot see themselves in anything less than the aristocratic comfort of a huge, stately limousine. The lucky ones manage to combine the two by hiring a vintage Rolls which has the impact as well as comfort and novelty.

All these possibilities can be hired in most areas but, whatever you decide to travel to your wedding in, do book it early.

You would be surprised how popular your particular choice will prove if you leave it till the very last minute!

Finally, do think twice before allowing a well meaning friend or relative to provide the transport.

So many things can go wrong between the enthusiastic offer being made and the big day itself. At least with a professional transport supplier, you can be sure, whatever happens, neither bride nor groom will be marooned or forced to seek a seat on public transport.

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