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'Hangover cure' Piqa Boo pear grown in Maidstone features at Kent's National Fruit Show as Brexit concerns continue

A pear with properties that can reportedly reduce hangovers has won a growing award at a farming convention.

The Piqa Boo pear, grown by Clive Baxter at his farm near Maidstone, came first as a result of its innovation at the National Fruit Show.

Watch KMTV's report on award-winning fruit and Brexit concerns at the National Fruit Show.

The show took place over two days at the Kent County Showground and looked to celebrate quality produce grown across the county and the rest of the UK.

Mr Baxter stumbled upon the properties of the juice of the pears while researching them online.

He said: "The Koreans have always said if you drink Asian pear juice it helps with hangovers that some people suffer with as a result of drinking alcohol.

"The Australian government has actually researched this and says among other health benefits it does relieve hangovers."

Clive Baxter is growing the pears at his farm in Maidstone
Clive Baxter is growing the pears at his farm in Maidstone

Researchers in 2015 found that drinking 200ml of Asian pear juice before consuming alcohol limited the effects of a hangover.

They also concluded eating the pears themselves had similar hangover-reducing properties.

Despite their conclusions, researchers could not work out what exactly it is about Asian pear juice that wards off the effects of alcohol.

It is thought the juice reduces the toxic metabolic responsible for the symptoms of a hangover.

The fruit is an Asian pear crossed with a European variety and was originally developed in New Zealand.

The show was a chance to celebrate quality local fruit
The show was a chance to celebrate quality local fruit

Alongside selling the fruit in supermarkets next year, Mr Baxter is also looking to market the juice itself soon, calling it Nashi Gold.

Despite the celebration of successful growing, concerns were raised over a shortage of seasonal pickers as the October 31 Brexit deadline looms.

Minette Batters, president of the National Farmers Union (NFU), officially opened the show, using the opportunity to highlight the potential effect of Brexit on the agriculture industry.

She said: "People are feeling less welcome to come here and we have challenges around the exchange rate, so we really need a government that is prepared to work with us so we can keep fruit, veg and flowers on the shelves."

The union president added that she does not see seasonal workers as an immigration issue, and would urge the government to increase the seasonal agricultural workers scheme.

Minette Batters, president of the NFU, is concerned about the loss of seasonal workers post-Brexit
Minette Batters, president of the NFU, is concerned about the loss of seasonal workers post-Brexit

James Simpson, managing director of Kent-based fruit company Adrian Scripps, fears he will struggle if seasonal workers do not travel to the UK after Brexit.

He said: "We're short of workers. Where Brexit is compounding the issue is a loss of free movement, and that means we could be desperately short of short term labour, to the tune of 80,000 workers we need in horticulture to harvest crops.

"They probably aren't going to be there unless we can maintain something for free movement."

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