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Photos of The Great Storm of 1987 as the Storm Ciara and Storm Dennis clear up continues

Over the last few weeks Kenthas felt two storms rip across the county.

Storm Ciara's 50mph winds halted rail services, caused flooding across the county and 1,606 properties in Kent had their power go out.

Residents survey the damage in Orchard Drive after the Great Storm in October 1987
Residents survey the damage in Orchard Drive after the Great Storm in October 1987

"Millions" of shell fish were washed up on Littlestone beach, on Romney Marsh, following the storm - drawing seagulls and foxes onto the sand.

More recently, the 60mph winds of Storm Dennis caused a roof of a shopping centre to collapse in Herne Bay, power cuts and was linked to one fatality in Margate.

A tree trunk in a field in Boughton Monchelsea, Maidstone.
A tree trunk in a field in Boughton Monchelsea, Maidstone.

Some areas have seen a months worth of rainfall in just 24 hours.

But this isn't the first time the county has been battered by the elements.

In 1987, 110mph winds tore up the south of England and north of France, causing chaos across Kent.

The sea raging at Hythe seafront during the Great Storm of 1987. (29624854)
The sea raging at Hythe seafront during the Great Storm of 1987. (29624854)

The majority of the damage happened on the night of October 16 between 2am and 6am.

Four of the 18 people who died as a result were from Kent, in the worst storm since 1903.

Among those who died was father-of-three Richard Ashlin, head of geography at Maplesden Noakes School, Maidstone.

The 38-year-old died after falling from his roof as he attempted to fix a dislodged tile.

A huge tree is uprooted and collapses on the home of retired head teacher Jon Boad, in Chicago Avenue, Gillingham.
A huge tree is uprooted and collapses on the home of retired head teacher Jon Boad, in Chicago Avenue, Gillingham.

Sosamma “Susie” Shilling, 55, from Walderslade died after a tree fell and came crashing through her roof.

Tony Tedlar was a British Rail worker in Gravesend. He died after a tree slid down an embankment into him.

Biddenden tree surgeon, Bob Homewood, 59, was crushed in his home when the chimneys collapsed.

The storm was called a once in a lifetime event, with storms as strong as these only hitting the county every 200 years.

Holter's Mill damaged in the great storm of 1987
Holter's Mill damaged in the great storm of 1987

The roof of Holter's Mill in Canterbury sustained great damage and was torn away by the wind.

Before it all began, BBC weather forecaster Michael Fish responded to a concerned caller saying a hurricane was not about to hit, assuring viewers the storm would mostly pass over Spain and France.

With the clip being played repeatedly over the years, Mr Fish clarified his remarks referred to Florida and were a link to a news story about devastation in the Caribbean that had just been broadcast.

He told KentOnline in 2015: "I wish I had a penny for each time that clip has been broadcast, I'd be a millionaire."

The roots of a large oak blown over at Godinton House, Ashford, after the Great Storm in October 1987
The roots of a large oak blown over at Godinton House, Ashford, after the Great Storm in October 1987

Fifteen million trees were lost during the course of the storm, uprooted from the ground by hurricane force winds.

Demonstrating the amazing power of the winds that October, a picture was taken of a fallen tree in Ashford with roots towering over the pictured lady.

The billions of pounds in repairs took many years to complete, with stories of damaged homes, fallen trees and overturned lorries echoing throughout the county.

Damage caused by the Great Storm of 1987 in Allhallows Caravan Park
Damage caused by the Great Storm of 1987 in Allhallows Caravan Park

Even mobile homes in at the Allhallows Caravan Park were picked up by the winds.

St Justus Church was completely flattened by The Great Storm and the remains of the walls and roof covered the floor of the building.

The Church was later rebuilt and stands in Rochester today.

St Justus Church, Rochester, was completely flattened by the Great Storm of 1987
St Justus Church, Rochester, was completely flattened by the Great Storm of 1987

Since 1987, a number of storms have caused havoc across the county.

In 2013, the county was swept up in a Christmas storm where windspeeds reached up to 80mph overnight.

Among the travel disruption and damage to trees and fences, there was also large amounts of flooding.

Around 900 passengers were trapped on P&O's Spirit of Britain ferry for 14 hours as the storm made it unsafe to dock at Dover harbour.

Tonbridge Park under water. Picture: Sunshine Parties
Tonbridge Park under water. Picture: Sunshine Parties

In February 2016, Storm Imogen threw dramatic waves up across Kent's coast in areas such as Herne Bay and Dover.

Further inland, trees were falling due to the strong winds and some lamp posts were even damaged in Gravesend.

Storm Brian, which hit the county in October 2017, also displayed some very impressive waves. Luckily, no major aftermath was caused by the storm, despite it's 70mph winds.

More damage was caused by the 60mph winds of Storm Eleanor early into January 2018.

Hundreds of homes went without power and fire crews were called to deal with flooding in Gillingham.

A tree fallen on A20 in Offham during Storm Eleanor, Tunbridge Wells
A tree fallen on A20 in Offham during Storm Eleanor, Tunbridge Wells

For all the forecasts, warnings and weather related news, click here.

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